Posts Tagged ‘root vegetables’

This is an example of unsophisticated home-cooking that makes up for its lack of visual pizzaz with wonderful flavor and texture. Age-bitashi is a dish in which the main ingredients have been deep-fried, then soaked in a flavorful broth. The main ingredients of this particular Age-bitashi are Jakoten (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jakoten) and Sato-imo (taro) which are plentiful […]


It’s hard for me to believe that Japan is the only country where burdock root is eaten as a vegetable, but I’ve read it and I’ve heard it time and time again, so I guess it’s true. I have a great respect for root vegetables, especially the ones commonly used in Japanese cooking, including daikon […]


Here’s a wagashi (traditional Japanese confection) recipe that is more in the style of Chinese Dim Sum. I tweaked a recipe I found in Haruko Kanezuka’s book Wa no Oyatsu (Japanese snacks). It is not overly sweet, as so many Western desserts tend to be, but that’s only one of the reasons I like it […]


Burdock root is a very familiar ingredient in Japanese cooking, and is apparently just as popular in Korea and (according to Wikipedia) Italy, Brazil and Portugal. It is low in calories, and high in minerals and dietary fiber. I was at loss how to explain the taste, so I’ll just quote from Wiki: The root […]


Ingredients: Turnips w/ leaves attached…………….4 Lemon……………………………………………..1 Salt………………………………………………..2/3 teaspoon Directions: 1. Peel and quarter the turnips (lengthwise), and then slice each quarter into thin triangles. Coarsely chop the leaves. 2. Slice the unpeeled lemon in half (lengthwise) and then slice each half into very thin half circles. 3. Place (1) and (2) into a sturdy zip-lock […]


One of the few food-related traditions that I inherited from my childhood home is “o-zoni,” or Japanese New Years Soup. The “o” is an honorific, so from here on I’ll refer to it as zoni. Zoni is a soup containing mochi rice cakes, and for the first 30 years of my life it never occurred […]


This is my own twist on a traditional Japanese sweet potato snack called Daigaku Imo, which involves deep-frying chunks of sweet potato and coating them with a sweet syrup. Ingredients: Satsuma Sweet Potato, 1 large oil for deep-frying for the sauce: water, 1/3 cup sugar, 1/4 cup butter, 1 or 2 Tablespoons fresh ginger root, […]