Archive for the ‘Salad’ Category

2 uncooked medium-sized potatoes 5 slices smoked salmon 1 Tablespoon Pesto 2 Tablespoons mayonnaise 1/2 teaspoon fresh lemon juice Salt, pepper to taste 1. Peel the potatoes and use a slicer to make very thin slices. Then cut the slices lengthwise with a knife to make thin matchsticks. Place the potato sticks in a bowl […]


Mizore, which literally means “sleet” in Japanese, is also a culinary term used to describe clear soups or nabe-mono into which finely grated daikon radish has been stirred.  Ae stands for Ae-mono, one of the basic categories of Japanese cuisine in which small-cut ingredients (often cooked vegetables such as spinach or green beans), are tossed […]


It’s hard for me to believe that Japan is the only country where burdock root is eaten as a vegetable, but I’ve read it and I’ve heard it time and time again, so I guess it’s true. I have a great respect for root vegetables, especially the ones commonly used in Japanese cooking, including daikon […]


If you live in Japan, or have access to some of the more common Japanese snack foods, you have certainly seen– and probably eaten– some of the huge variety of dried squid products that are usually packaged in small quantities as a jerky-type snack to accompany alcoholic beverages. I’m a great lover of squid myself, […]


Burdock root is a very familiar ingredient in Japanese cooking, and is apparently just as popular in Korea and (according to Wikipedia) Italy, Brazil and Portugal. It is low in calories, and high in minerals and dietary fiber. I was at loss how to explain the taste, so I’ll just quote from Wiki: The root […]


Ingredients: Turnips w/ leaves attached…………….4 Lemon……………………………………………..1 Salt………………………………………………..2/3 teaspoon Directions: 1. Peel and quarter the turnips (lengthwise), and then slice each quarter into thin triangles. Coarsely chop the leaves. 2. Slice the unpeeled lemon in half (lengthwise) and then slice each half into very thin half circles. 3. Place (1) and (2) into a sturdy zip-lock […]


The photo above shows a cluster of yuzu next to a mandarin orange (mikan). Maybe you can see that the yuzu has a lighter color and is bumpier than the mandarin orange. These yuzu are small because they grew in my friend’s back yard, but commercially grown ones can get to almost the size of […]